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AV communication review

, Volume 16, Issue 1, pp 33–56 | Cite as

Programing visual presentations for procedural learning

  • George L. Gropper
Articles
  • 18 Downloads

Keywords

Actual Practice Student Response Visual Presentation Procedural Learn Assembly Task 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    Gropper, George L.“WhyIs a Picture Worth a Thousand Words?”AV Communication Review 11: 75–95; July-August 1963.Google Scholar
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    -.Controlling Student Responses During Visual Presentations, Report No. 2.Studies in Televised Instruction: The Role of Visuals in Verbal Learning. Study No. 1 —An Investigation of Response Control During Visual Presentations. Study No. 2 —Integrating Visual and Verbal Presentations. Pittsburgh, Pa.: American Institutes for Research, October 1965.104 pp.Google Scholar
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    —. “Learning from Visuals: Some Behavioral Considerations.”AV Communication Review 14: 37–69; Spring 1966.Google Scholar
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    Lumsdaine, Arthur A.; Sulzer, Richard L; and Kopstein, Felix F. “The Effect of Animation Cues and Repetition of Examples on Learning from an Instructional Film.”Student Response in Programmed Instruction. (Edited by Arthur A. Lumsdaine.) Washington, D.C.: National Academy of Sciences, National Research Council, 1961. pp. 241–71.Google Scholar
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    Sheffield, Fred D.; Margolius, Garry J.; and Hoehn, Arthur J. “Experiments on Perceptual Mediation in the Learning of Organizable Sequences.”Student Response in Programmed Instruction. (Edited by Arthur A. Lumsdaine.) Washington, D.C: National Academy of Sciences, National Research Council, 1961. pp. 107–17.Google Scholar
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    Wulff, J. Jepson, and Kraeling, Doris. “Familiarization Procedures Used as Adjuncts to Assembly-Task Training with a Demonstration Film.”Student Response in Programmed Instruction. (Edited by Arthur A. Lumsdaine.) Washington, D.C: National Academy of Sciences, National Research Council, 1961. pp. 141–55.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Association for Educational Communications and Technology 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • George L. Gropper
    • 1
  1. 1.Instructional Media StudiesThe American Institutes for ResearchPittsburgh

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