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AV communication review

, Volume 15, Issue 3, pp 269–284 | Cite as

Use of videotaped instructional television for teaching study skills in a university setting

  • Charles O. Neidt
Articles
  • 17 Downloads

Keywords

Grade Point Average Football Player Achievement Level Study Skill Study Habit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Association for Educational Communications and Technology 1967

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles O. Neidt
    • 1
  1. 1.Human Factors Research LaboratoryFort Collins

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