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International Urology and Nephrology

, Volume 26, Issue 5, pp 519–522 | Cite as

Adherence ofCandida albicans to epithelial cells from normal and cancerous urinary bladders

  • A. T. Skoutelis
  • P. E. Lianou
  • E. Votta
  • H. P. Bassaris
  • J. T. Papavassiliou
Article
  • 33 Downloads

Abstract

Patients with malignancies are at high risk to develop infections byCandida albicans. We have compared the adherence ofC. albicans isolated from urine cultures to bladder epithelial cells obtained from healthy volunteers and patients with cancer of the bladder. The mean number ofC. albicans adhering per epithelial cell from areas infiltrated from cancer was significantly higher as compared to cells obtained from intact areas of cancerous bladders bladders and from normal bladders. The increased adherence ofC. albicans to cancerous epithelial cell suggests that malignancies are associated with alterations of the epithelial cell surface which render the cells more susceptible to colonization byC. albicans. The increased colonization may predispose these patients toC. albicans infections.

Keywords

Cancerous Bladder Candida Albicans International Urology Invasive Candidiasis Cancerous Epithelial Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. T. Skoutelis
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. E. Lianou
    • 1
    • 2
  • E. Votta
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. P. Bassaris
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. T. Papavassiliou
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Medicine, Section of Infectious DiseasesPatras University Medical SchoolPatrasGreece
  2. 2.Department of MicrobiologyAthen University Medical SchoolAthensGreece

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