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Effects of head injury experience on head injury misconceptions

  • Judith R. O’Jile
  • Laurie M. Ryan
  • Judith Parks-Levy
  • Wm. Drew Gouvier
  • Brian Betz
  • Dawn E. Haptonstahl
  • Robert C. Coon
Article

Abstract

This study examined the prevalence of misconceptions and effects of head injury experience on the knowledge of head-injury sequelae in a college population. In comparison to previous studies, the college sample demonstrated a lower endorsement of misconceptions relative to the general population. Although there were some significant differences between head-injured and non-head injured subjects’ responses to several items, the overall patterns of responses for the two groups were quite similar. The results suggest that experience with head injury does not necessarily increase knowledge of head injury sequelae and may even bias perceptions in the direction toward increased misconceptions.

Key Words

mild head injury misconceptions traumatic brain injury 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judith R. O’Jile
    • 1
  • Laurie M. Ryan
    • 2
  • Judith Parks-Levy
    • 3
  • Wm. Drew Gouvier
    • 3
  • Brian Betz
    • 4
  • Dawn E. Haptonstahl
    • 3
  • Robert C. Coon
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryDartmouth CollegeHanover
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral SciencesMedical University of South CarolinaCharleston
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyLouisiana State UniversityBaton Rouge
  4. 4.Department of PsychiatryUCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute & HospitalLos Angeles

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