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Genetic changes of life history and behavioral traits during mass-rearing in the melon Fly,Bactrocera cucurbitae (Diptera: Tephritidae)

  • Takahisa Miyatake
Special Feature

Abstract

Quantitative genetic studies for life history and behavioral traits are important in quality control for insect mass-rearing programs. Firstly, a brief history of quality control in mass-reared insects is described. Next, the differentiation of many traits of wild and mass-reared melon flies,Bactrocera cucurbitae, in Okinawa is reviewed, and the factors which have caused variation in these traits are considered. As artificial selection pressures are thought to be more important than inbreeding depression and genetic drift in the mass-reared strain of the Okinawan melon fly, two artificial selection experiments were conducted to evaluate genetic variations and genetic correlations among life history and behavioral traits. These are divergent selections for age at reproduction and for developmental period. The genetic relationship among 5 traits, i.e. longevity, age at reproduction, developmental period, circadian period, and time of mating was clarified and discussed in relation to genetic changes of traits during the mass-rearing. The results suggest that the genetic trade-off relationships between traits should be taken into account in mass-rearing programs.

Key words

genetic correlation life history mass-rearing quality control quantitative genetics selection 

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Copyright information

© The Society of Population Ecology and Springer Japan 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Okinawa Prefectural Agricultural Experiment StationNaha, OkinawaJapan

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