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TechTrends

, Volume 48, Issue 4, pp 52–55 | Cite as

Instructional technologies in developing countries: A contextual analysis approach

  • Sonia Arias
  • Kevin A. Clark
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Conclusion

This paper proposes an expanded context-based analysis approach for implementing instructional technology in developing countries by calling for the front-end analysis phase of the design process to include an analysis of the socio-cultural, environmental and institutional factors surrounding the instructional problem. Given that there is an increased application of instructional technology in developing countries and limited human capacity to appropriately design instructional technology interventions, it is imperative that instructional designers working in developing countries take into account the contextual factors outlined in the adapted Tessmer and Richey (1997) model. This adapted context-based analysis model for instructional design, if appropriately applied, may increase the probability of successful instructional technology initiatives in developing countries. Although this context-based model was expanded to include factors related to developing countries, the factors described in this paper exist in developed country settings as well. The authors would, therefore, encourage the use of this expanded model in settings that can include, but are not limited to, certain rural and urban areas in industrialized countries as well.

Keywords

Instructional Design Instructional Technology Utility Perception Technology Team Learner Profile 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sonia Arias
  • Kevin A. Clark

There are no affiliations available

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