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TechTrends

, Volume 47, Issue 5, pp 22–27 | Cite as

What and how do designers design?

A theory of design structure
  • Andrew S. Gibbons
Article

Conclusion

The design-layering concept has many implications. In this paper I have explored one of them that explains the maturation in designer thinking over time. In order to move to a new perspective of design it is not necessary to leave older views behind. The new principles added as the designer becomes knowledgeable about each new layer adds to the designer’s range and to the sophistication of the designs that are possible. Further consideration of the layering concept will expand our ability to communicate designs in richer detail, achieve more sophisticated designs, and add to our understanding of the design process itself.

Keywords

Annual Review Instructional Design Design Thinking Design Construct Layering Concept 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew S. Gibbons

There are no affiliations available

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