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Journal of Forest Research

, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 157–163 | Cite as

Cost, energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) effectiveness of a harvesting and transporting system for residual forest biomass

  • Takuyuki Yoshioka
  • Kazuhiro Aruga
  • Hideo Sakai
  • Hiroshi Kobayashi
  • Toshio Nitami
Original Articles

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility of a system to harvest logging residues (or slashes) as a new resource for energy in Japan. A harvesting and transporting system for residual forest biomass was constructed with reference to some European countries where the utilization of bioenergy is making steady progress and examined on the basis of field experiments in Japanese forestry. The feasibility of the system is discussed from the standpoints of cost and energy, and the system is compared with those of the European countries. With respect to the system proposed in this study, it is desirable that the process of chipper comminuting is incorporated into the system as early as possible, considering the trends of harvesting cost and fuel consumption per unit weight of residual forest biomass. Such a system is not particularly feasible in Japan from the standpoint of the harvesting cost per MWh of bioenergy. However, no specific problems are found from the point of view of the energy input rate, and it is clarified that it is possible for Japan to reduce domestic carbon dioxide emissions by utilizing biomass as an energy resource. A comparison with the European countries and a preliminary sensitivity analysis of the system demonstrate that the technical development to reduce the harvesting cost,e.g., improving the forwarding and transporting efficiency, and support from the government are essential for realizing bioenergy utilization in Japan.

Key words

bioenergy biomass carbon dioxide (CO2) emission harvesting and transporting system logging residue (slash) 

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Forest Society and Springer 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takuyuki Yoshioka
    • 1
  • Kazuhiro Aruga
    • 1
  • Hideo Sakai
    • 2
  • Hiroshi Kobayashi
    • 1
  • Toshio Nitami
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of Agricultural and Life SciencesThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  2. 2.University Forest in Chichibu, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life SciencesThe University of TokyoChichibuJapan

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