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Journal of Forest Research

, Volume 4, Issue 3, pp 223–228 | Cite as

Changes in soil chemical and physical characteristics in Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa Endl.) stands by mixture of deciduous broad-leaved trees in the northern Kanto region of Japan

  • Terumasa Takahashi
  • Hiroto Toda
  • Kikuo Haibara
Original Articles

Abstract

In order to clarify the effects of a mixture of deciduous broad-leaved trees on soil fertility, we investigated litter biomass accumulation, mineral soil chemical and physical characteristics, characteristics of nitrogen mineralization, and the mutual relationships between them in Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) stands mixed with deciduous broad-leaved trees at different ratios (mixture ratio; MR = 0, 16, 33, 43, 100% by basal area) in the northern Kanto region of Japan. Litter biomass in the forest floor and mineral soil was 19.1 Mg ha−1 in MR 0% and decreased approximately 60 % in MR 33%, MR 43% and MR100%. The permeability at 0–5 cm soil depth in MR100% was twice as much as that in MR 0%. Increases in soil permeability were likely due to larger soil pores in the higher MR with much accumulated deciduous broad-leaves. At 0–5 cm soil depth, the differences in carbon concentration among the plots were not clear. On the other hand, carbon concentrations at 5–10 cm depth increased from 90 g kg−1 to 147 g kg−1 with increases in MR from 0% to 100%. Concentrations of exchangeable bases increased two to four times with increases in MR from 0 to 100% at 0–10 cm depth. Soil pH (H2O) generally increased with increases in MR at each depth. The rates of net nitrogen mineralization at 0–5 cm depthin vitro increased from 25 to 87 mg kg−1 2 weeks−1 with increases in MR from 0 to 100%. However, increases in nitrification with increases in MR were not clear compared with nitrogen mineralization. These results indicated that a mixture of deciduous broad-leaved trees in a Japanese cypress stand was effective in preventing soil fertility decline.

Key words

Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa Endl.) mixture of deciduous broad-leaved trees prevention of soil fertility decline soil chemistry soil physical characteristics 

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Forest Society and Springer 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Terumasa Takahashi
    • 1
  • Hiroto Toda
    • 2
  • Kikuo Haibara
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of HorticultureChiba UniversityMatsudoJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of AgricultureTokyo University of Agriculture and TechnologyFuchuJapan

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