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Forum for Social Economics

, Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 63–74 | Cite as

Economic life, rights, and obligations: Perspectives from theological teleology

  • Albino Barrera
Symposium What is Human Economics?

Abstract

Even while acknowledging the autonomy of “laws” specific to economics, theology situates the view of economics as a “means-ends” science of human choices within an unavoidable overarching moral order. After all, economic life is merely part of a much larger personal quest for happiness. Thus, the efficient selection of means for particular ends necessarily takes place within the context of objective standards of economic rights and obligations as part of human nature. The teleological perspectives of theology add much to our understanding of economic life by providing the warrants for these rights and obligations.

Keywords

Human Dignity Social Economic Human Person Economic Life Fair Exchange 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Albino Barrera
    • 1
  1. 1.Providence CollegeProvidenceUSA

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