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Bulletin of Materials Science

, Volume 22, Issue 4, pp 741–749 | Cite as

System Cu-Rh-O: Phase diagram and thermodynamic properties of ternary oxides CuRhO2 and CuRh2O4

  • K T Jacob
  • T H Okabe
  • T Uda
  • Y Waseda
Oxide Materials

Abstract

An isothermal section of the phase diagram for the system Cu-Rh-O at 1273 K has been established by equilibration of samples representing eighteen different compositions, and phase identification after quenching by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDX). In addition to the binary oxides Cu2O, CuO, and Rh2O3, two ternary oxides CuRhO2 and CuRh2O4 were identified. Both the ternary oxides were in equilibrium with metallic Rh. There was no evidence of the oxide Cu2Rh2O5 reported in the literature. Solid alloys were found to be in equilibrium with Cu2O. Based on the phase relations, two solid-state cells were designed to measure the Gibbs energies of formation of the two ternary oxides. Yttria-stabilized zirconia was used as the solid electrolyte, and an equimolar mixture of Rh+Rh2O3 as the reference electrode. The reference electrode was selected to generate a small electromotive force (emf), and thus minimize polarization of the three-phase electrode. When the driving force for oxygen transport through the solid electrolyte is small, electrochemical flux of oxygen from the high oxygen potential electrode to the low potential electrode is negligible. The measurements were conducted in the temperature range from 900 to 1300 K. The thermodynamic data can be represented by the following equations: {fx741-1} where Δf(ox) G o is the standard Gibbs energy of formation of the interoxide compounds from their component binary oxides. Based on the thermodynamic information, chemical potential diagrams for the system Cu-Rh-O were developed.

Keywords

Phase equilibria ternary Cu-Rh-O Gibbs energy of formation enthalpy of formation entropy of formation chemical potential diagram 

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Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Sciences 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • K T Jacob
    • 1
  • T H Okabe
    • 1
  • T Uda
    • 1
  • Y Waseda
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Center for Metallurgical Process Engineering, Institute for Advanced Materials ProcessingTohoku UniversitySendaiJapan

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