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Applied Biochemistry and Microbiology

, Volume 36, Issue 2, pp 194–196 | Cite as

Effects of Exin on the development of microbial infection and ethylene release in plants

  • Hua Kvuet Chian
  • Nguen Tien Thang
  • Ngo Ke Syong
  • E. A. Bulantseva
  • M. A. Protsenko
  • E. G. Sal’kova
Article
  • 18 Downloads

Abstract

Effects of Exin on infection of tomato, potato, and cabbage plants withPseudomonas solanacearum andErwinia carotovora and a fungusSclervtium rolfsii were studied. The treatment of infected plants with Exin caused no significant effect on the development of the disease. Treatment with streptomycin as a standard for comparison completely inhibited the growth of these microorganisms. Pretreatment with Exin for one to eight days before infection inhibited the development of diseases. The numbers of tomato and potato plants damaged among those infected withP. solanacearum were lower by 10 and 35% respectively. In field experiments (350 plants per variant), treatment with Exin decreased the development of wilt caused byS. rolfsii andP. solanacearum and rot caused byE. carotovora. Treatment with Exin activated the release of ethylene for not less than 30 days. Possible mechanisms of the effects of Exin are discussed.

Keywords

Salicylic Acid Apply Biochemistry Chitinase Tomato Plant Potato Plant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica” 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hua Kvuet Chian
    • 1
  • Nguen Tien Thang
    • 1
  • Ngo Ke Syong
    • 1
  • E. A. Bulantseva
    • 2
  • M. A. Protsenko
    • 2
  • E. G. Sal’kova
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Tropical BiologyHo Chi Minh CityVietnam
  2. 2.Bach Institute of BiochemistryRussian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia

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