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International Journal of Primatology

, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 233–255 | Cite as

Social organization and ecology of proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) in mixed coastal forest in Sarawak

  • Elizabeth L. Bennett
  • Anthony C. Sebastian
Article

Abstract

Data are presented from a 16-month study of proboscis monkeys in an area of mixed coastal forest in Sarawak. The population density, social organization, and feeding and ranging behavior are described in detail. Results are compared with those from other primates in an attempt to understand why females of certain species (including proboscis monkeys) transfer between social groups. The scarcity of available food and reasons for the limited habitat preferences of proboscis monkeys are also discussed.

Key words

proboscis monkey colobine social organization female transfer ecology mangrove swamp forest Borneo 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elizabeth L. Bennett
    • 1
  • Anthony C. Sebastian
    • 1
  1. 1.World Wildlife Fund MalaysiaKuchingMalaysia

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