Advertisement

International Journal of Primatology

, Volume 9, Issue 5, pp 393–407 | Cite as

Grooming interactions among adult chimpanzees at Bossou, Guinea, with special reference to social structure

  • Yukimaru Sugiyama
Article

Abstract

Grooming and proximity interactions among chimpanzees at Bossou, Republic of Guinea, were analyzed as an index of friendly and affinitive relationships among adult males, among adult females, and between the sexes. Data from the first (1976–1977) and the third (1982–1983) study period were used. The expected value of their interactions was calculated from the number of adult males and females in the group and also from the observed frequency of combinations of adult males and females in the parties (temporary foraging groups). In the pooled data from the two periods, there was little difference between grooming and proximity (without grooming). The frequency of male-female grooming and proximity interactions was lower than expected, and that of female-female interactions was higher than expected. The frequencies of male-male grooming and proximity were intermediate but fluctuated. Male-male grooming frequency was lower than that recorded in chimpanzees of East Africa. Characteristics of same-sex affinitive interactions, especially between Bossou chimpanzee females, clearly differ from those of East African chimpanzees and are more like those recorded for female-related groups of Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata).These differences indicate the variability and flexibility of chimpanzee social structure.

Key words

affinitive relationships:Pan troglodytes versus female-related group grooming proximity migration pattern 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. deWaal, F. (1982).Chimpanzee Politics, Harper and Row, New York.Google Scholar
  2. deWaal, F. (1986). The integration of dominance and social bonding in primates.Q. Rev. Biol. 61: 459–479.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Ghiglieri, M. P. (1984).The Chimpanzees of Kibale Forest, Columbia University Press, New York.Google Scholar
  4. Goodall, J. (1965). Chimpanzees of the Gombe Stream Reserve. In DeVore, I. (ed.),Primate Behavior: Field Studies of Monkeys and Apes, Holt, Rinehart and Winston, New York, pp. 425–473.Google Scholar
  5. Goodall, J. (1983). Population dynamics during a 15-year period in one community of free-living chimpanzees in the Gombe National Park, Tanzania.Z.Tierpsychol. 61: 1–60.Google Scholar
  6. Goodall, J. (1986).The Chimpanzees of Gombe, Harvard University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  7. Kano, T. (1986).The Last Ape, Doubutsu-sha, Tokyo (Japanese).Google Scholar
  8. Kawanaka, K., and Nishida, T. (1975). Recent advances in the study of inter-unit-group relationships and social structure of wild chimpanzees of the Mahale Mountains. In Kondo, S., Kawai, M., Ehara, A., and Kawamura, S. (eds.),Proceedings from the Symposia of the Fifth Congress of the International Primatological Society, Japan Science Press, Tokyo, pp. 173–186.Google Scholar
  9. Koyama, N. (1977). Social structure of Japanese monkeys. In Itani, J. (ed.),Anthropology, Series 2, Primates, Yuzankau, Tokyo, pp. 225–276. (Japanese).Google Scholar
  10. Kuroda, S. (1982).The Pygmy Chimpanzee, Chikuma-Shobo, Tokyo, (Japanese).Google Scholar
  11. Mori, A. (1982). An ethological study on chimpanzees at the artificial feeding place in the Mahale Mountains, Tanzania, with special reference to the booming situation.Primates 23: 45–65.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Nishida, T., and Kawanaka, K. (1972). Inter-unit group relationships among wild chimpanzees of the Mahale Mountains.Kyoto Univ. Afr. Stud. 7: 131–169. Park, pp. 73–121.Google Scholar
  13. Nishida, T., and Kawanaka, K. (1972). Inter-unit relationships among wild chimpanzees of the Mahale Mountains.Kyoto Univ. Afr. Stud. 7: 131–169.Google Scholar
  14. Nishida, T., and Tachibana, T. (1987). Primatology report No. 7.Anima 173: 98–104 (Japanese).Google Scholar
  15. Simpson, M. J. A. (1973). The social grooming of male chimpanzees. In Michael, R. P., and Crook, J. H. (eds.),Comparative Ecology and Behaviour of Primates, Academic Press, London, pp. 411–505.Google Scholar
  16. Sugiyama, Y. (1981). Observations on the population dynamics and behavior of wild chimpanzees at Bossou, Guinea, 1979–1980.Primates 22: 435–444.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Sugiyama, Y. (1984). Population dynamics of wild chimpanzees at Bossou, Guinea, between 1976–1983.Primates 25: 391–400.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Sugiyama, Y. (1987). Adaptation and variability of primate social structure.Kikan Jinruigaku 18: 3–46 (Japanese).Google Scholar
  19. Sugiyama, Y. (1989). Population dynamics of chimpanzees at Bossou, Guinea. In Heltne, P. G., and Marquardt, L. G. (eds.),Understanding Chimpanzees, Harvard University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  20. Sugiyama, Y. and Roman, J. (1979). Social structure and dynamics of wild chimpanzees at Bossou, Guinea.Primates 20: 323–339.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Sugiyama, Y., and Koman, J. (1979b). Tool-using and making behavior in wild chimpanzees at Bossou, Guinea.Primates 20: 513–524.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Sugiyama, Y., and Koman, J. (1987). A preliminary list of chimpanzees’ alimentation at Bossou, Guinea.Primates 28: 133–147.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Sugiyama, Y., and Soumah, A. G. (1988). A preliminary survey on the distribution and population of chimpanzees in the Republic of Guinea.Primates 29: 569–574.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Wrangham, R. W. (1979). Sex differences in chimpanzee dispersion. In Hamburg, D. A., and McCown, E. R. (eds.),The Great Apes, Benjamin/Cummings, Menlo Park, pp. 481–489.Google Scholar
  25. Wrangham, R. W. (1980). An ecological model of female-bonded primate groups.Behaviour 75: 262–299.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yukimaru Sugiyama
    • 1
  1. 1.Kyoto University Primate Research InstituteInuyamaJapan

Personalised recommendations