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Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science

, Volume 11, Issue 3, pp 259–268 | Cite as

How good is the overseas competition?: A survey of car dealers in America

  • Phillip Niffenegger
  • Jeremy Odlin
Article
  • 58 Downloads

Abstract

This paper reports on a survey of car dealers in six states. Dealers were asked to rate cars “made in the U.S.A.” in comparison to imports from four overseas countries. The results suggest several potential areas for product improvement in U.S. models but also identified a number of areas where U.S. makes were judged as superior.

Keywords

German Model Free Trade Policy Agree Agree Southern Market Association Specific Product Attribute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Academy of Marketing Science 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Phillip Niffenegger
    • 1
  • Jeremy Odlin
  1. 1.Murray State University

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