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The Indian Journal of Pediatrics

, Volume 70, Issue 5, pp 401–405 | Cite as

Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)

  • G. Bhaskar
  • Rakesh Lodha
  • S. K. Kabra
Special Article

Abstract

Several cases of life threatening respiratory disease with no identifiable cause were reported from Guangdong Province, China; these were soon followed by reports from many other countries. The disease was named as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). A novel coronavirus, isolated from the respiratory secretions of patients, has been implicated in the causation of SARS. The modes of transmission include droplet spread, close contact, and Fomites; shedding of virus from respiratory tract is the primary mode of transmission. SARS clinically presents with high-grade fever, chills and rigors, myalgia, headache, cough with or without sputum production, dyspnea, and dizziness. Chest radiographs reveal unilateral or bilateral, predominantly peripheral, areas of consolidation progressing with in a short time of bilateral patchy consolidation. Preliminary reports suggest a milder illness in young children. The case definition of probable SARS cases, laboratory investigations and precautions for prevention of spread are discussed.

Key words

SARS Diagnosis Children 

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Copyright information

© Dr. K C Chaudhuri Foundation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Bhaskar
    • 1
  • Rakesh Lodha
    • 1
  • S. K. Kabra
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsAll India Institute of Medical SciencesNew Delhi

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