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Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science

, Volume 11, Issue 4, pp 417–432 | Cite as

Methodological problems in the comparative analysis of international marketing systems

  • Lothar G. Winter
  • Charles R. Prohaska
Article

Abstract

This article investigates the methodological problems relevant to comparative studies in the field of international marketing. The comparative method is defined as a search for similarities and differences which can be found in various foreign marketing systems.

In this paper, we survey much of the recent literature of the social sciences in an examination of current methodological problems and issues, as well as some of the proposed solutions. Throughout the literature we found major recurring themes in the discussions of comparative studies in nearly all disciplines of the social sciences, although there seem to be a lack of an integrative theory or framework which can be used as a basis of cooperative and mutual support by researchers. Furthermore, we found that major issues may have been over-emphasized. Our findings indicate that the major categories of the comparative approach in marketing consist of documentary studies, the case method, cross-cultural surveys and the use of aggregate statistical information.

Keywords

Comparative Method Methodological Problem Comparative Research World Politics International Marketing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Academy of Marketing Science 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lothar G. Winter
    • 1
    • 2
  • Charles R. Prohaska
    • 3
  1. 1.University of New MexicoUSA
  2. 2.University of MarburgGermany
  3. 3.University of Charleston

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