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The Review of Black Political Economy

, Volume 27, Issue 4, pp 43–64 | Cite as

Returning Aftican American farmers to the land: Recent trends and a policy rationale

  • Spencer D. Wood
  • Jess Gilbert
Articles

Keywords

United States Department Racial Discrimination Southern State Black Political Economy Action Team 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Spencer D. Wood
  • Jess Gilbert

There are no affiliations available

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