Practical Failure Analysis

, Volume 2, Issue 1, pp 33–42 | Cite as

Failure of Al-Mg-Si alloys in bending

  • P. A. Friedman
  • S. G. Luckey
Peer Reviewed Articles

Abstract

The bendability of two Al-Mg-Si heat-treatable alloys was studied and compared with the performance of a non-heat-treatable Al-Mg alloy. A semi-guided wrap-bend tester consistent with ASTM E290 was used to obtain minimum bend radii and produce consistent bend radii for analysis of fracture mechanisms. Bending failure in these alloys was based on a surface roughening, or orange peel, process where the outer surface grains separated and produced depressions on the surface of the material. These depressions acted as notches that increased local stresses and eventually caused failure. The fracture was intergranular in nature, with a jagged crack progressing through the thickness of the material. Several factors that affect the bendability of AA6xxx alloys are quantified in this study. Critical elements regarding natural aging, artificial aging, deformation, and composition are discussed.

A parameter of specific interest is the inclusion of copper in these alloys. Copper was added in an effort to increase the artificial aging response of selected alloys. This is of particular importance in the automotive industry because artificial aging occurs during the painting process, but adequate time and temperature is not provided to fully strengthen the alloys. It is believed by some automotive manufacturers that the inclusion of copper can have a negative effect on formability and bendability.

Keywords

aluminum bending bendability fracture hemming 

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Copyright information

© ASM International - The Materials Information Society 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. A. Friedman
    • 1
  • S. G. Luckey
    • 1
  1. 1.Ford Research LaboratoryDearborn

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