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Practical failure analysis

, Volume 1, Issue 3, pp 63–72 | Cite as

Crankshaft failure and why it may happen again

  • D. A. Moore
  • K. F. Packer
  • A. J. Jones
  • D. M. Carlson
Peer Reviewed Articles

Abstract

This case study involves two continuously cast steel crankshaft failures. Three parties performed their own failure analyses: (1) the engine manufacturer responsible for component design, specification, and application; (2) the steel supplier and forging supplier responsible for making the steel, forging the shape, and preliminary heat treatment; and (3) a supplier that provided induction hardening, finish machining, and inspection. An independent fourth party engineering firm was subsequently involved, but because each party had their own agenda, there was no agreement on the metallurgical failure cause and therefore no continued analysis to pin-down and eliminate the root cause. A classic case showing how we may be doomed to repeat our failures because sound engineering was not allowed to proceed.

Keywords

crankshaft continuous cast steel segregation woody fracture MnS inclusions fatigue induction hardening 

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References

  1. 1.
    V.J. Colangelo and F.A. Heiser:Analysis of Metallurgical Failures, John Wiley & Sons, New York, NY, 1974.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Metals Handbook, Vol. 11,Failure Analysis and Prevention, 9th ed, American Society for Metals, Metals Park, OH, 1986.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© ASM International - The Materials Information Society 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. A. Moore
    • 1
  • K. F. Packer
    • 1
  • A. J. Jones
    • 1
  • D. M. Carlson
    • 1
  1. 1.Packer Engineering, Inc.Naperville

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