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Bulletin of Materials Science

, Volume 28, Issue 7, pp 643–646 | Cite as

Effect of temperature and α-irradiation on gas permeability for polymeric membrane

  • Vaibhav Kulshrestha
  • K. Awasthi
  • N. K. Acharya
  • M. Singh
  • Y. K. Vijay
Polymers

Abstract

In the present study the polyethersulphone (PES) membranes of thickness (35 ±2) μm were prepared by solution cast method. The permeability of these membranes was calculated by varying the temperature and by irradiation of α ions. For the variation of temperature, the gas permeation cell was dipped in a constant temperature water bath in the temperature range from 303–373 K, which is well below the glass transition temperature (498 K). The permeability of H2 and CO2 increased with increasing temperature. The PES membrane was exposed by a-source (95Am241) of strength (1 μ Ci) in vacuum of the order of 10−6 torr, with fluence 2.7 × 107 ions/cm2. The permeability of H2 and CO2 has been observed for irradiated membrane with increasing etching time. The permeability increases with increasing etching time for both gases. There was a sudden change in permeability for both the gases when observed at 18 min etching. At this stage the tracks are visible with optical instrument, which confirms that the pores are generated. Most of pores seen in the micrograph are circular cross-section ones.

Keywords

Activation energy gas permeability permselectivity track etched membrane critical etching time 

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Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Sciences 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vaibhav Kulshrestha
    • 1
  • K. Awasthi
    • 1
  • N. K. Acharya
    • 1
  • M. Singh
    • 1
  • Y. K. Vijay
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsUniversity of RajasthanJaipurIndia

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