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Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv

, Volume 138, Issue 4, pp 629–651 | Cite as

What’s trade got to do with it? Relative demand for skills within Swedish manufacturing

  • Robert Anderton
  • Paul Brenton
  • Eva Oscarsson
Articles

Abstract

What’s Trade Got to Do with It? Relative Demand for Skills within Swedish Manufacturing. — This paper seeks to identify the contribution of trade and technological change to the increase in inequality between skilled and unskilled workers in Sweden since the 1970s. An empirical approach is adopted which allows for the outsourcing of the low-skill parts of the production chain to low-wage locations and is applied to detailed industry and bilateral trade data, the latter distinguishing between low-wage sources of imports and OECD countries. The paper finds that, in contrast to previous studies, trade with low-wage countries may have contributed to the rise in inequality in Swedish manufacturing. The empirical results also suggest that the increased use of technology also played a role in creating greater inequality between skilled and unskilled workers in Sweden, with the magnitude of this impact increasing in the 1990s.

F160 J31 O33 

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Copyright information

© Institut fur Weltwirtschaft an der Universitat Kiel 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Anderton
  • Paul Brenton
  • Eva Oscarsson

There are no affiliations available

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