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Journal of Earth System Science

, Volume 113, Issue 4, pp 819–829 | Cite as

Possible lava tube system in a hummocky lava flow at Daund, western Deccan Volcanic Province, India

  • Raymond A. Duraiswami
  • Ninad R. Bondre
  • Gauri Dole
Article

Abstract

A hummocky flow characterised by the presence of toes, lobes, tumuli and possible lava tube system is exposed near Daund, western Deccan Volcanic Province, India. The lava tube system is exposed as several exhumed outcrops and is composed of complex branching and discontinuous segments. The roof of the lava tube has collapsed but original lava tube walls and fragments of the tube roof are seen at numerous places along the tube. At some places the tube walls exhibit a single layer of lava lining, whereas, at other places it shows an additional layer characterised by smooth surface and polygonal cracks. The presence of a branching and meandering lava tube system in the Daund flow, which represents the terminal parts of Thakurwadi Formation, shows that the hummocky flow developed at a low local volumetric flow rate. This tube system developed in the thinner parts of the flow sequence; and tumuli developed in areas where the tube clogged temporarily in the sluggish flow.

Keywords

Pahoehoe lava tube inflation emplacement Deccan Volcanic Province 

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Copyright information

© Printed in India 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raymond A. Duraiswami
    • 1
  • Ninad R. Bondre
    • 2
  • Gauri Dole
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of GeologyUniversity of PunePuneIndia
  2. 2.Department of GeologyMiami UniversityOxford

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