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Pediatric Radiology

, Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 17–18 | Cite as

Giant hypothalamic hamartoma: An unusual neonatal tumor

  • L. Guibaud
  • V. Rode
  • G. Saint-Pierre
  • J. -P. Pracros
  • P. Foray
  • V. A. Tran-Minh
Originals

Abstract

A case of neonatal manifestation of giant hypothalamic hamartoma is reported. It is suggested that hypothalamic hamartoma should be included in the list of neonatal intracerebral tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging appearance similar to that of normal gray matter on T1-weighted images and slightly hyperintense on T2-weighted images, without enhancement after gadolinium injection, is suggestive of the diagnosis.

Hypothalamic hamartomas are congenital malformations, consisting of disorganized mature neuronal elements in proportions similar to that of normal tissue [1]. They are clinically evidenced in infants ranging from 1 to 7 years of age [1–5]. This report describes a histologically proved giant hypothalamic hamartoma diagnosed in the neonatal period. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is helpful to distinguish this congenital non-evolution malformation from more aggressive neonatal tumors.

Keywords

Public Health Magnetic Resonance Imaging Normal Tissue Gray Matter Gadolinium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Guibaud
    • 1
  • V. Rode
    • 2
  • G. Saint-Pierre
    • 3
  • J. -P. Pracros
    • 2
  • P. Foray
    • 2
  • V. A. Tran-Minh
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Radiology, Montreal General HospitalMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  2. 2.Department of Pediatric Radiology, Hôpital DebrousseUniversité Claude-Bernard Lyon ILyon Cedex 05France
  3. 3.Department of Neuropathology, Hôpital Neurologique P. WertheimerUniversité Claude-Bernard Lyon ILyon Cedex 03France

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