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Amino Acids

, Volume 12, Issue 2, pp 191–204 | Cite as

Canavanine derivatives useful in peptide synthesis

  • T. Pajpanova
  • S. Stoev
  • E. Golovinsky
  • G. -J. Krauß
  • J. Miersch
Full Papers

Summary

The objective of this work is to investigate the possibilities for introducing the currently used Nα-, NG- and C-protective groups into the canavanine molecule and the preparation of canavanines selectively blocked at the guanidino function. These novel compounds will find application in the synthesis of canavanine derivatives expected to be amino acid antimetabolites and of canavanine modified biologically active peptides.

Keywords

Amino acids Canavanine Canavanine derivatives-antimetabolites Alkaline protease Penicillin amidase 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Pajpanova
    • 1
  • S. Stoev
    • 1
  • E. Golovinsky
    • 1
  • G. -J. Krauß
    • 2
  • J. Miersch
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Molecular BiologyBulgarian Academy of SciencesBAS SofiaBulgaria
  2. 2.Department of Biochemistry and BiotechnologyMartin-Luther-UniversityHalleGermany

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