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Amino Acids

, Volume 16, Issue 2, pp 107–111 | Cite as

A comparison of15N proline and13C leucine for monitoring protein biosynthesis in the skin

  • J. Doumit
  • J. Le
  • J. Frey
  • A. Chamson
  • C. Perier
Full Papers

Summary

The tracers L15N-proline and L(1-13C)-leucine were used to explore the synthesis of skin proteins in vivo in rabbits. They orally received a single dose containing an equimolecular mixture of L(1-13C)-leucine and L15N-proline. The changes in the amounts of these tracers in blood and skin were monitored for a total of 8 h. The data showed the appearance of the two tracers in blood within 15 min and their clearance in 8h. They were both rapidly (15 min) incorporated into skin proteins, but more proline was incorporated than leucine. We therefore consider L15N-proline to be a better tracer than L(1-13C)-leucine for studying protein metabolism in the skin.

Keywords

Amino acids Tissue protein synthesis Stable isotope amino acids 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Doumit
    • 1
  • J. Le
    • 1
  • J. Frey
    • 1
  • A. Chamson
    • 1
  • C. Perier
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de BiochimieFaculté de MédecineSaint-Etienne Cedex 2France

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