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Journal of Evolutionary Economics

, Volume 3, Issue 2, pp 89–107 | Cite as

Artificial worlds and economics, part I

  • David A. Lane
Article

Abstract

In this and a companion paper (Lane 1993), I describe a class of models, called artificial worlds (AWs), that are designed to give insight into a process called emergent hierarchical organization (EHO). This paper introduces the ideas of EHO and AWs and discusses some of the interferential problems involved in trying to learn about EHO by constructing and studying the properties of AWs. It concludes by introducing two abstract AWs that address important general problems in EHO: the relation between structure and function, and the dynamics of evolutionary processes. The companion paper will discuss several AWs expressly designed to model particular economic phenomena.

Key words

Emergence Organization Evolutionary dynamics Lambda calculus 

JEL-classification

D 70 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • David A. Lane
    • 1
  1. 1.School of StatisticsUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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