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AI & Society

, Volume 9, Issue 2–3, pp 208–217 | Cite as

Requirement acquisition in system development: A human-centred perspective of the tacit requirements

  • Yoshihiro Sato
Article

Abstract

Specification acquisition in the system design process has been improved since the middle of the 1980s when the upper CASE tools appeared. On the contrary the quality of requirement acquisition in the upper processes of system design has not been enhanced as much as specification acquisition. Understanding the user's requirements is indispensable as one of the basic conditions for building systems that can really satisfy users.

This article discusses obtaining requirement knowledge, in terms of human-centred design. The focus is on the process of requirement acquisition, where there is room for one to make full use of human knowledge in a dynamic manner.

Keywords

Collaborative design Human-centred systems Requirement acquisition Support tool System design Tacit requirement knowledge 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoshihiro Sato
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Institute of System ScienceNTT Data Communications Systems CorporationJapan

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