Advertisement

Bovine serum albumin (BSA) can replace patient serum as a protein source in an in vitro fertilization (IVF) program

  • Claudio A. Benadiva
  • Barbara Kuczynski-Brown
  • Tobi G. maguire
  • Luigi MastroianniJr.
  • George L. Flickinger
Special Contributions

Abstract

Alternate protein sources have been suggested to replace the commonly used cord or patient serum for in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures. During an 11-month period 127 patients treated for in vitro fertilization had elther their serum (N= 71) or bovine serum albumin (BSA;N= 56) used as the protein source in the insemination and growth media. Ham's F-10+0.5% BSA was used for sperm swim-up and insemination media and 1% BSA was used for the growth media. Patient's serum was added to Ham's F-10 culture media at concentrations of 7.5 and 15% for insemination and growth, respectively. Embryo transfer was performed with Ham's F-10 containing 90% maternal serum in both groups. Fertilization rate of 259 oocytes inseminated in medium containing patient's serum did not differ when compared with 200 oocytes inseminated in medium containing BSA. Likewise, rates of obnormal fertilization, cleavage, and pregnancy were similar in both groups. In a second experiment, 148 normally fertilized oocytes were transferred after 24 hr in culture to growth media containing two different concentrations of BSA (0.5 or 1%). Cleavage rates for the two groups were similar and the percentage of embryas developed to ≧4 cells did not differ signficantly. We conclude that a single concentration of BSA can safely be used to supplement culture media in human IVF with several practical and economical benefits.

Key Words

bovine serum albumin (BSA) human in vitro fertilization (IVF) 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Ogawa T, Marrs RP: The effect of protein supplementation on single-cell mouse embryos in vitro. Fertil Steril 1987,47:146–161Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Feichtinger W, Kemeter P, Menezo, Y: The use of synthetic culture medium and patient serum for human in vitro fertilization and embryo replacement. J Vitro Fert Embryo Transfer 1986,3:87–92Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Quinn P, Kerin J, Wilson L, Brown J: Comparison of using patients' preovulatory serum and bovine serum albumin as a protein source in medium for human in vitro fertilization and gamete transfer. Program Supplement, 43rd Annual Meeting of the American Fertility Society, 1987, Abstr P-128Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Caro CM, Trouson A: Successful fertilization embryo development, and pregnancy in human IVF using a chemically defined culture medium containing no protein. J Vitro Fert Embryo Transfer 1986,3:215–217Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Saito H, Berger T, Mishell DR, Marrs RF: Effect of variable concentration of serum on mouse embryo development. Fertil Steril 1984,41:460–464PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Saito H, Berger T, Mishell DR, Marrs RP: The effect of serum fractions on embryo growth. Fertil Steril 1984,41:761–765PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Shirley B, Wortham JWE Jr, Witmyer J, Condon-Mahony M, Fort G: Effects of human serum and plasma on development of mouse embryos in culture media. Fertil Steril 1985,43:129–134PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Ogawa T, Ono T, Marrs, RP: The effect of serum fractions on single-cell mouse embryos in vitro. J Vitro Fert Embryo Transfer 1987,4:153–157Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Menezo Y, Testart J, Perrone D: Serum is not necessary in human in vitro fertilization, early embryo culture, and transfer. Fertil Steril 1984,42:750–755PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Kane MT, Headon DR: The role of commercial bovine serum albumin preparations in the culture of one-cell rabbit embryos to blastocysts. J Reprod Fert 1980,60:469–475Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Claudio A. Benadiva
    • 1
  • Barbara Kuczynski-Brown
    • 1
  • Tobi G. maguire
    • 1
  • Luigi MastroianniJr.
    • 1
  • George L. Flickinger
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyHospital of the University of Pennsylvania, School of MedicinePhiladelphia

Personalised recommendations