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Journal of Intelligent Information Systems

, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp 39–52 | Cite as

Selecting among rules induced from a hurricane database

  • John A. Major
  • John J. Mangano
Article

Abstract

Rule induction can achieve orders of magnitude reduction in the volume of data descriptions. For example, we applied a commercial tool (IXL tm ) to a 1,819 record tropical storm database, yielding 161 rules. However, human comprehension of the discovered results may require further reduction. We present a rule refinement strategy, partly implemented in a Prolog program, that operationalizes “interestingness” into performance, simplicity, novelty, and significance. Applying the strategy to the induced rulebase yielded 10 “genuinely interesting” rules.

Keywords

knowledge discovery rule refinement interestingness hurricanes 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • John A. Major
    • 1
  • John J. Mangano
    • 2
  1. 1.Newington
  2. 2.Guy Carpenter & Co., Inc.Hartford

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