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Cytotechnology

, Volume 14, Issue 2, pp 129–146 | Cite as

Change in growth kinetics of hybridoma cells entrapped in collagen gel affected by alkaline supply

  • Yoshihito Shirai
  • Masaaki Yamaguchi
  • Atsuko Kobayashi
  • Akihiro Nishi
  • Hisao Nakamura
  • Hiroki Murakami
Technical Report

Abstract

The growth yields for glucose and glutamine of murine hybridoma cells entrapped in collagen gel particles were examined during the growth phase. The immobilized hybridoma cells were cultivated in a fluidized bed fermenter where the medium was circulating to supply oxygen separately. Procedures to supply an alkaline solution for adjusting the pH level strongly affected the growth yields. A direct supply of the alkaline solution to the cultivation system reduced both the growth yields for glucose and glutamine, probably due to a local increase in pH level. On the other hand, when fresh medium in which the pH was adjusted to around 8.5 was added to the cultivation system, the growth yields were unchanged even at the same pH level as when direct alkaline supply was used. These results suggest that an indirect alkaline supply could be recommended to ajust the pH level when using medium-circulating-fermenters.

Key words

growth kinetics growth yield collagen fluidized bed reactor immobilization alkali supply 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoshihito Shirai
    • 1
  • Masaaki Yamaguchi
    • 1
  • Atsuko Kobayashi
    • 1
  • Akihiro Nishi
    • 2
  • Hisao Nakamura
    • 2
  • Hiroki Murakami
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Biochemical Engineering and Science, Faculty of Computer Science and Systems EngineeringKyushu Institute of TechnologyIizuka, FukuokaJapan
  2. 2.Scientific Instruments DivisionTosoh Co. Ltd.TokyoJapan
  3. 3.Grad. School of Genetic Resources TechnologyKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan

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