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Foundations of Physics

, Volume 19, Issue 10, pp 1191–1213 | Cite as

A theoretical device for space and time measurements

  • Edward A. Desloge
Article

Abstract

A theoretical device, which incorporates the functions of clock, rod, nonrotating platform, and accelerometer, and whose operation depends on the properties of light rays and free particles, is defined. The device, which we call a metrosphere, is simple enough that it can be introduced at the starting point of relativity theory and versatile enough that it can serve as an aid in the development and conceptualization of the theory. Relative to an inertial frame, a moving metrosphere undergoes a Lorentz-Fitzgerald contraction and the associated clock exhibits a Lorentz-Larmor rate retardation. From this fact and the assumption that there exists one inertial frame, it is possible to generate the kinematical results of special relativity. A metrosphere provides an observer with a local frame of reference, hence it is well adapted to the needs of general relativity, allows the equivalence principle to be introduced in a straightforward manner, and permits a smooth transition from special relativity to general relativity.

Keywords

General Relativity Rate Retardation Time Measurement Special Relativity Smooth Transition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward A. Desloge
    • 1
  1. 1.Physics DepartmentFlorida State UniversityTallahassee

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