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Chemistry of Natural Compounds

, Volume 9, Issue 1, pp 69–74 | Cite as

Synthesis and investigation of the myotropic activity of some fragments of [5-valine]angiotensin

  • G. I. Chipens
  • A. P. Pavar
  • V. E. Klusha
  • Yu. E. Antsan
  • V. K. Kibirev
Article
  • 16 Downloads

Summary

1. A number of fragments of angiotensin have been synthesized: asparaginylarginine, asparaginylarginylvaline, asparaginylarginylvalyltyrosine, asparaginylarginylvalyltyrosylvalylhistidine, valyltyrosylvalylhistidine, and prolylphenylalanine.

2. The fragments of the hormone differ both in their affinity for the receptor and in their internal activity and capacity for antagonizing or potentiating the action of angiotensin, which shows the existence of a definite functional organization of the molecule of the hormone.

3. The C-terminal amino acid residues of angiotensin include the bulk of the information necessary for the formation of a complex with the receptor, and the N-terminal acids that for the formation of the secondary signal.

Keywords

Methyl Ester Angiotensin Phosphorus Pentoxide Palladium Black Hydrogen Bromide 

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Copyright information

© Consultants Bureau, a division of Plenum Publishing Corporation 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. I. Chipens
  • A. P. Pavar
  • V. E. Klusha
  • Yu. E. Antsan
  • V. K. Kibirev

There are no affiliations available

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