Chemistry of Natural Compounds

, Volume 9, Issue 6, pp 752–755 | Cite as

The structure of gallotannins

  • I. Sh. Buziashvili
  • N. F. Komissarenko
  • I. P. Kovalev
  • V. G. Gordienko
  • D. G. Kolesnikov
Article

Summary

1. It has been established that the semiacetal hydroxyls of the carbohydrate components of the tannins of the smoketree and of Turkish galls are substituted by galloyl residues and the C3 hydroxy group is free; on the other hand, in the tannins from sumac and Chinese galls all the hydroxy groups of the sugars are substituted by galloyl residues with the exception of the semiacetal hydroxyl.

2. It has been found that in the tannin from sumac, of the six gallic acid residues four are in the form of digalloyl and two in the form of monogalloyl groups; in the tannins from the smoketree and Chinese galls, of the seven gallic acid residues three are in the form of a trigalloyl, two of a digalloyl, and two of monogalloyl groups. In the tannin from Turkish galls, of the five gallic acid residues three are in the form of a trigalloyl and two of a digalloyl residue.

Keywords

Tannin Gallic Acid Carbohydrate Component Galloyl Sugar Proton 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Sh. Buziashvili
  • N. F. Komissarenko
  • I. P. Kovalev
  • V. G. Gordienko
  • D. G. Kolesnikov

There are no affiliations available

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