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Marine Biology

, Volume 87, Issue 1, pp 55–60 | Cite as

Lifespan and oviposition of the parasitic copepod Pseudomyicola spinosus under rearing conditions

  • T. Kajihara
  • K. Nakamura
Article

Abstract

The facultative parasitic copepod Pseudomyicola spinosus (Raffaele & Monticelli) was cultured and mated under laboratory conditions. Twenty virgin females were cultured in isolation and mated. They were cultured individually after mating, and examined for lifespan, number of ovipositions, number of eggs, and other features. The longest lifespan of a female P. spinosus was 2.3 years (849 d). This female laid eggs 106 times after a single mating, and all of the eggs developed. The lifespan and number of ovipositions varied with the individual, but the interval between ovipositions showed less variation (7.0±2.3 d). The number of eggs laid at one oviposition decreased with the increase in the age of the female. The number of eggs at each oviposition was smaller in laboratory females than in wild females, but the oviposition rhythm and the interval between ovipositions seemed to be the same. The sperms seem to survive for quite a while in the seminal receptacle of a female. A male can copulate a multiple of times. The lifespan of P. spinosus in the natural environment should be less than a year, considering the lifespan of the host mussels.

Keywords

Natural Environment Laboratory Condition Virgin Female Laboratory Female Rear Condition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Kajihara
    • 1
  • K. Nakamura
    • 2
  1. 1.Ocean Research InstituteUniversity of TokyoNakano-ku, TokyoJapan
  2. 2.Higashiyamato High SchoolHigashiyamato City, TokyoJapan

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