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Marine Biology

, Volume 64, Issue 3, pp 291–297 | Cite as

Field and experimental studies on cadmium in the edible crab Cancer pagurus

  • I. M. Davies
  • G. Topping
  • W. C. Graham
  • C. R. Falconer
  • A. D. McIntosh
  • D. Saward
Article

Abstract

The distribution of cadmium within captive crabs (Cancer pagurus) exposed experimentally to cadmium-contaminated food and water is described and illustrated by triangular diagrams. Crabs from the Orkney Islands (Scotland) are known to contain relatively high levels of cadmium (up to 62 μg g-1 wet wt) in the hepatopancreas. The distribution of cadmium between the hepatopancreas, gonad, gill, carapace, claw muscle, heart, and haemolymph, is described in crabs collected during 1978, and compared with similar data from crabs exposed to cadmium for ca. 300 d (September 1978 – June 1979) experimentally. It is concluded that the dominant uptake route of cadmium to Orkney crabs is through their diet.

Keywords

Experimental Study Cadmium Similar Data Triangular Diagram Uptake Route 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. M. Davies
    • 1
  • G. Topping
    • 1
  • W. C. Graham
    • 1
  • C. R. Falconer
    • 1
  • A. D. McIntosh
    • 1
  • D. Saward
    • 1
  1. 1.Marine LaboratoryDepartment of Agriculture and Fisheries for ScotlandAberdeenScotland, UK

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