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Marine Biology

, Volume 26, Issue 3, pp 249–260 | Cite as

Biochemistry and microbiology of some Irish Sea sediments: I. Amino-acid analyses

  • C. D. Litchfield
  • A. L. S. Munro
  • L. C. Massie
  • G. D. Floodgate
Article

Abstract

Cores of sedimentary mud, collected on a transect between the Isle of Man and Ireland, were qualitatively analysed for free amino acids by thin-layer chromatography of the dansylated (DNS) derivatives. The DNS derivatives of isoleucine/leucine and α-aminobutyric acid were found in all samples, while the derivatives of phenylalanine, valine, arginine and ammonia were usually present. Acid hydrolysis followed by treatment with ninhydrin showed the presence of peptidyl amino acids in half the DNS-reacted extracts. No distribution pattern of amino acids was found either with geographical location or down the depths of the cores. Attempts to quantify the method were unsuccessful. Other analyses indicated the presence of glucose/galactose, but no neutral or phospholipids or recognizable plant pigments were identified.

Keywords

Hydrolysis Arginine Geographical Location Phenylalanine Valine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. D. Litchfield
    • 1
    • 3
    • 2
  • A. L. S. Munro
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. C. Massie
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. D. Floodgate
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Marine Science LaboratoriesUniversity College of North WalesMenai BridgeUK
  2. 2.Marine LaboratoryAberdeenScotland, UK
  3. 3.Department of BacteriologyRutgers UniversityNew BrunswickUSA

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