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Marine Biology

, Volume 51, Issue 1, pp 1–8 | Cite as

Comparison of the feeding habits of migratory and non-migratory Stenobrachius leucopsarus (Myctophidae)

  • W. G. Pearcy
  • H. V. Lorz
  • W. Peterson
Article

Abstract

Stenobrachius leucopsarus, the most abundant species of myctophid fishes off Oregon, USA, has a bimodal distribution at night, with a peak of abundance in the upper 100 m composed of diel vertical migrants, and another peak at 300 to 500 m composed of fish that did not migrate the night they were caught. We compared the feeding habits of these two groups of fish in an attempt to learn if deep fish migrated to surface waters. Low similarity of diets, differences in the rank order of common prey, and similar states of stomach fullness and digestion of prey suggest that fish captured in deep water at night probably did not feed exclusively in shallow water on previous nights. They probably fed in deep water. The similarity in food habits between deep and shallow fish is most readily explained by daytime feeding by fish in deep water and by broad vertical distributions of prey.

Keywords

Deep Water Fresh Food Fish Scale Stomach Fullness Prey Taxon 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. G. Pearcy
    • 1
  • H. V. Lorz
    • 1
  • W. Peterson
    • 1
  1. 1.School of OceanographyOregon State UniversityCorvallisOregonUSA

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