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Marine Biology

, Volume 34, Issue 3, pp 273–283 | Cite as

The delineation of two plankton communities from one sampling site (Fire Island Inlet, Long Island, N.Y.)

  • S. S. Weaver
  • H. I. Hirshfield
Article

Abstract

Zooplankton and phytoplankton communities were observed and recorded at Fire Island Inlet from 1971–1974. Species typical of a temperate, neritic environment were found. Sampling by net and bottle at several stations in the area revealed two populations, one representative of the bay water and the other representative of the ocean water. It was further found, by comparing frequency of occurrence relative abundance, rank order and indicator species, that these two populations could be monitored at one sampling station (Oak Beach) by sampling at the appropriate tidal intervals, i.e., midtide after slack current, on both the ebb and flow tides. Observations from one site of plankton communities representative of bay water and of ocean water, as they move into and out of the Inlet, could be of significance in monitoring the effects of proposed man-made changes in the environment. It is possible that other coastal areas could benefit by such a combined approach.

Keywords

Phytoplankton Beach Relative Abundance Sampling Site Coastal Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. S. Weaver
    • 1
  • H. I. Hirshfield
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biology, Graduate School of Arts and SciencesNew York UniversityNew YorkUSA

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