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Marine Biology

, Volume 34, Issue 3, pp 201–209 | Cite as

Utility of ozone treatment in the maintenance of water quality in a closed marine system

  • K. V. Honn
  • W. Chavin
Article

Abstract

The use of ozone as an oxidative supplement to biological filtration and to control epizootic microbial outbreaks coincident with maintaining a biological filter was investigated in a 2,271-1 (600 gallon) closed marine-water system. Under conditions of a relatively large biomass load (1.82 kg/3801), filter-bed effluent levels of total ammonia (0.135±0.01 ppm), un-ionized ammonia (0.0074±0.0006 ppm) and nitrite (0.17±0.01 ppm) were maintained within acceptable limits. Reservoir ozonation (100 mg/h/380 l) further significantly reduced (P<0.005) these levels. Nitrates were significantly elevated (P<0.005) with ozonation. Cessation of ozonation elevated total ammonia, un-ionized ammonia and nitrite levels above acceptable limits within 24 h. Resuming ozonation rapidly reversed this trend. Ozone reduced the microbial content of the culture water. Ozonation is suggested as a means of maintaining oxidative flexibility when used as a supplement to biological filtration. Further, prevention of epizootic microbial outbreaks may be accomplished without danger to the biological filter provided a proper system design is utilized.

Keywords

Biomass Water Quality Ozonation Nitrite Acceptable Limit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. V. Honn
    • 1
  • W. Chavin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyWayne State UniversityDetroitUSA

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