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Marine Biology

, Volume 6, Issue 4, pp 357–364 | Cite as

Seasonal biochemical composition and energy sources of Sagitta hispida

  • M. R. Reeve
  • J. E. G. Raymont
  • J. K. B. Raymont
Article

Abstract

There are few available data on the biochemical composition of warm-water zooplankton in general, and chaetognaths in particular. Unlike populations from higher latitudes, many species probably breed to some extent throughout the year, with life cycles measured in weeks rather than months or years. Analysis of protein, fat, carbohydrate and ash in the chaetognath Sagitta hispidaConant over 1 year showed that, although protein is always the largest component, averaging 53% of the dry weight, it fluctuates widely. The non-protein fraction of the total nitrogen also fluctuates and averages over a third of the total. Experimentally fed and starved animals showed no such protein variability, which was ascribed, there-fore, to changes in environmental parameters other than food availability (e.g. salinity). Starved animals used up body protein, and the O:N ratio in freshly-caught animals also indicated a protein-based metabolism. Periods of starvation of at least 1/4 the length of its life cycle could be tolerated. S. hispida may be added to the list of a variety of planktonic groups over a range of latitudes and feeding habits, which appear to utilize protein as a normal energy source and reserve material.

Keywords

Nitrogen Carbohydrate Life Cycle Energy Source Total Nitrogen 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1970

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. R. Reeve
    • 1
  • J. E. G. Raymont
    • 2
  • J. K. B. Raymont
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Marine and Atmospheric SciencesUniversity of MiamiMiamiUSA
  2. 2.Department of OceanographyUniversity of SouthamptonSouthamptonEngland

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