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Crossing maize with sorghum, Tripsacum and millet: the products and their level of development following pollination

Summary

Maize was crossed with sorghum, Tripsacum and millet with the aim of introgressing desirable alien characteristics into maize. The products of crosses were analyzed as to their level of differentiation following pollination; their further development on artificial culture medium was compared. In spite of a stimulation rate close to 5%, no evidence of hybridization between maize and sorghum or millet could be obtained. The plants recovered proved to be of maternal origin. However, with an appreciable frequency, stimulation leading to hypertrophic growth of nucellar tissue was observed. This phenomenon is bound to pollination, never occurring in non-pollinated ears. In crosses involving Tripsacum, more than 140 true hybrids were isolated. The influence of the genotypes used as well as factors such as climatic conditions or in vitro techniques are discussed. Except for one haploid maize plant, all the plants recovered proved to be classical hybrids, most of them showing the expected complement of chromosomes from each parent (10 + 36 chromosomes), a few others being slightly hyperploid (2n = 47 to 50 chromosomes). No non-classical hybrids constituted by a nonreduced female gamete and a reduced male gamete were obtained.

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Communicated by R. Riley

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Bernard, S., Jewell, D.C. Crossing maize with sorghum, Tripsacum and millet: the products and their level of development following pollination. Theoret. Appl. Genetics 70, 474–483 (1985). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00305979

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Key words

  • Maize
  • Sorghum
  • Tripsacum
  • Intergeneric hybridization
  • In vitro grain development