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Applied Mathematics and Mechanics

, Volume 17, Issue 4, pp 299–308 | Cite as

A comparative study of the opening and closing process of two types of mechanical heart valves using ALE finite element method

  • Chen Dapeng
  • Zhang Jianhai
Article

Abstract

Using arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) finite element method, this paper made a comparative study of the opening and closing behaviour of a downstream directional valve (DDM) and a St. Jude medical valve (SJM) through a two dimensional model of mechanical valve-blood interaction in which the valve is considered as a rigid body rotating around a fixed point, and the blood is simplified as viscous incompressible fluid. It's concluded that: (1) Compared with SJM valve, DDM valve opens faster and closes the more gently. (2) The peak back-flow of DDM is smaller than that of SJM. The present investigation shows that being a better analogue of natural valve, DDM has a brighter potential on its durability than SJM.

Key words

artificial mechanical valve ALE finite element method fluid-solid interaction 

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Copyright information

© Editorial Committee of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chen Dapeng
    • 1
  • Zhang Jianhai
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Computational Engineering ScienceSouthwest Jiaotong UniversityChengduP. R. China

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