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Rheological and mechanical properties of bauxite residue as hot mix asphalt filler

  • Rajan ChoudharyEmail author
  • Abhinay Kumar
  • Ghazali Rahman
Article
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Abstract

Bauxite residue (red mud) is a highly alkaline solid waste generated in the process of production of aluminium metal from bauxite ore. More than 5.5 million tons of red mud is generated in India. The aluminium industries, worldwide and in India, have expressed strong need for dedicated research to explore large-scale utilization of red mud. Towards this end, the objective of this study is to investigate the use of red mud as a filler in hot mix asphalt (HMA). Stone dust, a traditionally used filler material, is used as the control filler. For a comprehensive evaluation approach, the present investigation is conducted at three levels: filler, mastic and mixture characterisation. Red mud and stone dust fillers are characterised using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), pH, Rigden voids, methylene blue value, particle size analysis, and specific surface measurement. Mastic rheology is studied using the dynamic shear rheometer by temperature sweep and multiple stress creep and recovery (MSCR) tests. Finally, dense-graded bituminous concrete (BC) mixes are designed by the Marshall method followed in India, at different filler contents of both filler types. Mixture performance is investigated in terms of indirect tensile strength and Cantabro abrasion loss. Results show that addition of both fillers improved the viscoelastic response of the base binder. Red mud mixes showed higher resistance to disintegration and higher tensile strength than the control mixes with stone dust filler. Based on the findings of this study, red mud showed good potential for use as a filler in dense graded bituminous mixes.

Keywords

Filler hot mix asphalt red mud waste utilization mastic rheology MSCR 

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Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors gratefully acknowledge National Aluminium Company (NALCO) Damanjodi, Odisha (India) for the red mud used in the study. The authors thank summer interns Ravi Ranjan and Shivam Kaushik for help during experimentation. Thanks to Central Instrumentation Facility, IIT Guwahati for FESEM analysis of filler materials.

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Copyright information

© Chinese Society of Pavement Engineering. Production and hosting by Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rajan Choudhary
    • 1
    Email author
  • Abhinay Kumar
    • 1
  • Ghazali Rahman
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Civil EngineeringIndian Institute of Technology GuwahatiGuwahatiIndia
  2. 2.Department of Civil EngineeringIntegral UniversityLucknowIndia

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