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Effect of Shape, Surface Modification and Concentration of Al2O3 Nanoparticles on Breakdown Performance of Transformer Oil

  • Muhammad RafiqEmail author
  • Yuzhen Lv
  • Chengrong Li
Original Article
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Abstract

The Al2O3 nanoparticles (NPs) with favorable features were prepared in our lab to develop transformer oil/paper insulation system with better insulation performance. The nanofluids (NFs) were prepared with different shapes (nanorods, nanoplates), surface modifications (oleic acid, C2, C18) and concentrations (0.6 g/L, 0.8 g/L, 1.2 g/L) of Al2O3 NPs. The positive lightning impulse (LI) breakdown voltages (VBDs) of mineral oil were improved by 1.11 times with nanorod shape, oleic acid surface modification and 0.8 g/L concentration of NPs. The effects of Al2O3 NPs with different gap distances on insulating properties of NFs under LI voltage were examined. It was noted that after Al2O3 NPs suspension, the positive LI VBDs of transformer oil (TO/MO) were enhanced but the negative LI VBDs of were decreased. The significant improvement in insulating performance of NFs is interpreted in light of electron traps theory. It was found that suspended NPs can enhance the shallow trap desity. The generated electrons would lose their kinetic energy through repeatedly trapping and de-trapping process, leading to decline in elcetron mobility. The higher trap density of NPs will lower average energy, and lower mobility of electrons are obtained. The electrons with lower energy are easy to be captured by those molecules with high electron affinity, and be converted into negative space charges. These negative space charge decreases the electrical field strength at the front of positive streamer and therefore reduce the propagating velocity of positive streamer.

Keywords

Nanofluids Transformer oil Shallow traps Nanoparticles Insulation Strength 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors acknowledge financial support for this work from the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Contract Number 51337003, and from the Chinese Ministry of Education Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities.

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Copyright information

© The Korean Institute of Electrical Engineers 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Electrical EngineeringUniversity of Engineering and TechnologyTaxilaPakistan
  2. 2.Beijing Key Laboratory of High Voltage and EMC, School of Electric and Electronic Engineering, School of Energy, Power and Mechanical EngineeringNorth China Electric Power UniversityBeijingChina
  3. 3.Beijing Key Laboratory of High Voltage and EMC, School of Electric and Electronic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy ResourcesNorth China Electric Power UniversityBeijingChina

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