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Frontiers of Engineering Management

, Volume 6, Issue 3, pp 433–452 | Cite as

A review of sustainability metrics for the construction and operation of airport and roadway infrastructure

  • Sarah M. L. HubbardEmail author
  • Bryan HubbardEmail author
Review Article
  • 7 Downloads

Abstract

Sustainability has become increasingly important, however, relatively little attention has focused on metrics for the construction and operation of airport and roadway infrastructure. Most attention has focused on buildings, with high profile BREEAM and LEED projects taking center stage. Sustainability is also important in airport and roadway infrastructure projects, which have significant public impact but have a much lower profile than vertical construction when it comes to sustainability. Sustainable infrastructure is important in China and India where new infrastructure is under construction to meet growing and developing economies, and in the US, where infrastructure is in substandard condition and requires reconstruction. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview and discussion of sustainability rating systems for airport and roadway infrastructure, including both construction and operation. Specific projects that highlight both proven and innovative sustainable practices are included to illustrate the application of these concepts. Finally, the relationship between sustainable transportation infrastructure and resilient transportation infrastructure is addressed since resiliency is of growing interest and there is overlap between these concepts.

Keywords

sustainable construction infrastructure airport roadway resiliency sustainability 

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Copyright information

© Higher Education Press 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Aviation and Transportation TechnologyPurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA
  2. 2.School of Building Construction Management TechnologyPurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA

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