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Antifungal activities of essential oils of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) and lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) on crown rot pathogens of banana

  • N. P. Kamsu
  • S. E. Tchinda
  • N. S. TchameniEmail author
  • D. P. M. Jazet
  • M. A. Madjouko
  • O. Youassi Youassi
  • M. L. Sameza
  • F. Tchoumbougnang
  • C. Menut
Research Article
  • 4 Downloads

Abstract

In the present study, yields of essential oils (EO) from Cinnamomum zeylanicum syn. C. verum and Cymbopogon citratus extracted by hydro-distillation were 0.38% and 0.27% respectively. Their chemical composition obtained by gas chromatography revealed that, cinnamon EO is mainly composed of thujanol (38.22%) and cinnamyl acetate (24.67%) while Lemongrass EO is characterized by linalool acetate (41.29%) and geraniol (32.15%). These oils significantly inhibited mycelial growth and conidia germination. Cinnamon oil was fungicidal at 2075 and 2000 µl/l while Lemongrass oil was fungicidal at 475, 350 and 600 µl/l, respectively, against Colletotrichum musae, Fusarium incarnatum and F. verticillioides. At 1025, 950 and 1088 µl/l C. zylanicum oil totally inhibited conidia germination of C. musae, F. incarnatum and F. verticillioides. For C. citrinus oil, total inhibited occurs at 200, 185 and 275 µl/l respectively, against C. musae, F. incarnatum and F. verticillioides.

Keywords

Essential oils Antifungal activity Cinnamon Lemongrass Crown rot Musa acuminate 

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Copyright information

© Indian Phytopathological Society 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. P. Kamsu
    • 1
  • S. E. Tchinda
    • 2
  • N. S. Tchameni
    • 1
    Email author
  • D. P. M. Jazet
    • 1
  • M. A. Madjouko
    • 1
  • O. Youassi Youassi
    • 1
  • M. L. Sameza
    • 1
  • F. Tchoumbougnang
    • 1
  • C. Menut
    • 3
  1. 1.Laboratory of Biochemistry, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of ScienceUniversity of DoualaDoualaCameroon
  2. 2.Laboratory of Microbiology, IUTUniversity of NgaoundereNgaoundereCameroon
  3. 3.Equipe “Glyco et nano-vecteurs pour le ciblage thérapeutique”, IBMM, Faculté de PharmacieMontpellierFrance

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