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Journal of Outdoor and Environmental Education

, Volume 21, Issue 3, pp 241–254 | Cite as

Rethinking relationships through education: wild pedagogies in practice

  • Marcus MorseEmail author
  • Bob Jickling
  • John Quay
Original paper

Abstract

Wild pedagogies are about rethinking our relationships within the world and represent a desire to let go of an overabundant sense of control, to invite the places we visit to become an integral part of our educational work and to respond to provocations in spontaneous, and at times unforeseen, ways. In this paper we provide a contextual background for wild pedagogies and outline key ideas that underpin this special issue of the Journal of Outdoor and Environmental Education. In doing so we situate some of these underpinning ideas within touchstones – intended as provocations and reminders of what we are trying to achieve. The touchstones described include: agency and the role of nature as co-teacher; wildness and challenging ideas of control; locating the wild; complexity, the unknown, and spontaneity; time and practice; and cultural change. These touchstones are drawn from experiments in practice and attempt to bring the more-than-human world actively into educational conversations.

Keywords

Wild pedagogies Environmental education Touchstones Franklin River 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

On behalf of all authors, the corresponding author states that there is no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Outdoor Education Australia 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.La Trobe UniversityBendigoAustralia
  2. 2.Lakehead UniversityWhitehorseCanada
  3. 3.University of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia

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