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Journal of Plant Pathology

, Volume 101, Issue 1, pp 23–29 | Cite as

Phylotypes of the potato bacterial wilt pathogen in the Philippines and their relationship to pathogen aggressiveness

  • Fe M. Dela Cueva
  • Mark Angelo O. BalendresEmail author
  • Valeriana P. Justo
  • Nandita Pathania
Original Article
  • 20 Downloads

Abstract

Three hundred seventy-two Ralstonia solanacearum isolates were collected from potato fields, in the Philippines, and characterized based on phylotypes, distribution and aggressiveness to host plants. Two major genetic group were identified: Phylotype I (Asiaticum), which were predominant in the southern region (Bukidnon), and Phylotype II (Americanum), found mainly in the northern region (Benguet). Phylotypes I and II were both pathogenic to tomato and potato host plants, but Phylotype I induced significantly earlier wilting symptoms to tomato and potato than Phylotype II (P = 0.03<0.01). No correlation was found between elevation and phylotype distribution (coefficient = 0.03–0.22). Based on the current taxonomic classification of R. solanacearum species complex, R. pseudosolanacearum and R. solanacearum cause potato bacterial wilt in the Philippines. Implications for quarantine regulations and breeding programs are discussed.

Keywords

Phylotyping Ralstonia solanacearum Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum Soil-borne plant disease Tomato bacterial wilt 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank Rizalina Tiongco, Danah Jean Concepcion, Aira Waje, Pearlie Jane Binahon, Michelle Vergara, Reynaldo Alegre, Eddie Bueta, Benedicto Welgas and Meldy Vibal for technical assistance. This study was part of a project (HORT/2007/066-3) funded by the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research and the Philippine Council for Agriculture, Aquatic and Natural Resources Research and Development of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST-PCAARRD), Philippines. The Institute of Plant Breeding and the University of the Philippines Los Banos have provided in-kind support and use of facilities. The authors declare no conflict of interests.

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Copyright information

© Società Italiana di Patologia Vegetale (S.I.Pa.V.) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fe M. Dela Cueva
    • 1
  • Mark Angelo O. Balendres
    • 1
    Email author
  • Valeriana P. Justo
    • 2
  • Nandita Pathania
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Plant Breeding, College of Agriculture and Food ScienceUniversity of the Philippines Los BanosLos BañosPhilippines
  2. 2.National Crop Protection Center, College of Agriculture and Food ScienceUniversity of the Philippines Los BanosLos BañosPhilippines
  3. 3.Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and ForestryMareebaAustralia

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