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Design of ultra-high sensitive biosensor to detect E. Coli in water

  • Sandip Kumar RoyEmail author
  • Preeta Sharan
Original Research

Abstract

Escherichia coli (abbreviated as E. coli) are bacteria found in water, in food. The present work focuses applications of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based biosensors to detect E. coli. SPR is a label-free technology that is used to detect biological samples. The SPR based biosensor design consists of optical wave guide with different structures of metal–dielectric interfaces and effort has been done to optimize design parameters for improved sensitivity. Metal-dielectric structures considered are Au–Si, Ag–Si, Au–GaAs and Ag–GaAs. Obtained simulation results indicates that the performance of the proposed sensor can be enhanced by varying the thickness and material of metal–dielectric interfaces. The device sensitivity obtained 1071.42 nm/RIU by considering metal-dielectric interface of Gold (thickness 0.074 μm) and Gallium Arsenide (thickness 0.22 μm). This result is significantly higher than sensitivity value of 250 nm/RIU found in published literature for similar type of sensor. From the simulation graph it is clear that for small change in refractive index (RI), value of 0.07 (1.33–1.4), there is significant shift in wavelength. This shows that the sensor is highly sensitive towards the change in RI and can be fabricated as lab-on-chip based biosensor. The optimized sensor was tested for detection for E. coli and sensitivity of 400 nm/RIU obtained. The design is compact and easy to fabricate using optical lithography as compared to the conventional optical component based SPR sensor.

Keywords

SPR E. Coli Biosensor FDTD Lab-on-chip Refractive index 

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Copyright information

© Bharati Vidyapeeth's Institute of Computer Applications and Management 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.AMC Engineering CollegeBangaloreIndia
  2. 2.The Oxford College of EngineeringBangaloreIndia

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